Blog

Rare dinosaur stomach fossil opens door to ancient world

June 2, 2020

Digestive organ only one of three in the world

Fresh ferns, loaded with spores, lightly dusted with leaves and twigs and perfectly seasoned with locally sourced charcoal. Sound good?…


B.C. secures new supply of surgical masks that exceed Health Canada standards

VICTORIA — Millions of respirator masks British Columbia purchased from a manufacturer in China have been given a stamp of approval by separate labs, making them available for health workers fighting the COVID-19 pandemic. Health Minister Adrian Dix says tests show the respirators exceed Health Canada requirements and they are the equivalent to the sought-after N95 masks made by 3M.…


When a pandemic comes to a disaster nurse’s backyard

We should be grateful for our healthcare system, says Squamish nurse who worked Ebola and other crises around the world

Ian MacKay apologizes for being in a bit of a daze, though to an outsider, he seems completely alert. When interviewed at the end of last month, the Squamish critical care nurse had just finished five nightshifts at Lions Gate Hospital, where he works in the ICU and emergency department.…


Province’s minimum wage increases to $14.60/hr

Poverty group says still not enough

B.C.’s minimum wage rose Monday, June 1, to $14.60 per hour, but it continues to be lower than the amount estimated to be necessary to support a family. The increase moved the minimum wage up from $13.85 per hour.…


A third of B.C. students return to part-time, in-class instruction

Education Minister Rob Fleming said approximately 60,000 students have returned to some in-class instruction across 60 school districts

About a third of British Columbian students returned to school this week with about a month left in the school year. According to the provincial government, 60,000 elementary, middle and secondary school students are participating in the province’s gradual introduction of part-time, in-class instruction.…


Wolf killed near Prince Rupert B.C. after rare attack on a human

Conservation does not think animal linked to pet attacks

Conservation officers in northwestern British Columbia have captured and killed a lone wolf that may have been responsible for a rare attack on a human. A social media post from the Conservation Officer Service said the wolf was spotted in Port Edward Monday afternoon.…


Whistler Health Care Centre hasn’t seen COVID-19 case since early April

Also, money being raised to buy portable ventilator for centre

The Whistler Health Care Centre (WHCC) has not seen a confirmed case of the novel coronavirus come through its doors since early April, but with B.C. gradually beginning to open up, it’s not unrealistic to expect a second wave of cases, relayed Whistler’s medical director. “We’re still testing and swabbing but we haven’t had any positives.…


B.C. immigration program well managed, but fraud, corruption are risks: auditor

VICTORIA — An audit says an immigration program that brings workers to British Columbia fills labour gaps but needs to improve safeguards for fraud and corruption. Russ Jones, B.C.’s acting auditor general, says the report on the provincial nominee program that attracts immigrants found high employment rates and that more than 85 per cent of those who became permanent residents stayed in the province.…


Craft cannabis growers seek role in COVID recovery

A newly-incorporated craft cannabis co-operative is putting forward a plan to make small-scale, independent cannabis businesses part of B.C.’s post-pandemic economic recovery. When it announced its incorporation in late April, the BC Craft Farmer Co-Op (BCCFC) said one of its first initiatives would be to draft an economic development proposal for the provincial and federal governments to “outline how the co-op can support B.C.’s economic recovery post-COVID 19 by creating thousands of jobs and diverting profits from the illicit market.”…


Video: Velosolutions Create the ‘World’s First Fully Electric Built’ Trail in Switzerland

pinkbike.com – Press Release: Velosolutions The visionary mindset, the overwhelming natural beauty, the endless mountain bike trails and an initiative called Greenstyle were the reasons for Velosolutions to move to…


Bird strike might have caused Snowbird crash

Early investigation looking at ‘environmental factors’ in crash that claimed one life

Bird strike might have caused Snowbird crash, early investigation finds Military investigators are pointing to video footage as the reason they suspect a bird strike was responsible for last month’s deadly Snowbird plane crash in British Columbia.…


B.C. government to protect some small businesses from evictions

Commercial property owners will be banned from evicting small business tenants that have lost at least 70% of their revenue during the pandemic

Small businesses in B.C. that have suffered significant revenue losses during the COVID-19 pandemic will be protected from eviction effective June 1. The provincial government announced Monday new measures to protect small businesses that are eligible for federal commercial rent assistance, but are unable to access that assistance because their landlords won’t apply to the program.…


Joint federal-provincial inquiry into N.S. mass shooting a good option: top expert

HALIFAX — As pressure mounts on the federal and Nova Scotia governments to call an inquiry into one of the worst mass killings in Canadian history, the country’s leading scholar on inquiries says Ottawa and the province should do the right thing and work together on a joint inquest. “I think that would really be the course to take,” said Ed Ratushny, a professor emeritus at the University of Ottawa’s law school.…


No glacier skiing/riding this year, WB says

June 1, 2020

‘I do not take the decision lightly:’ COO

As Whistler Blackcomb (WB) preps a scaled-back operating plan for the 2020 summer season, a longtime summer tradition won’t be returning this year. In an email to staff on June 1, WB chief operating officer Geoff Buchheister announced there will be no glacier skiing or riding this summer due to COVID-19.…


Feds offer early $2.2b payment to cities amid ‘cash crunch’

PM also addresses protests that unfolded across North America over the weekend

Ottawa is offering $2.2 billion to cities as they face what the prime minister describes as a “cash crunch” during the pandemic. The money was, in fact, already earmarked as federal support for cities via the gas tax fund.…


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